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FOSSIL SKULLS STONE TOOLS OVERVIEW HUMAN EVOLUTION 13 BIG QUESTIONS
Homo erectus georgicus
Homo erectus georgicus
Bradshaw Foundation Origins Archive
 
Homo erectus georgicus is the subspecies name sometimes used to describe fossil skulls and jaws found in Dmanisi, Georgia. It is known as 'Dmanisi Man', and was initially proposed as a sub-species of Homo erectus but it is now classified as a separate species. A partial skeleton was discovered in 2001.
HOMO ERECTUS GEORGICUS
HOMO ERECTUS GEORGICUS
Homo erectus
Genus: Homo
Species: Homo erectus georgicus
Other Names: Dimanisi Man
Time Period: 1.8m years ago
Characteristics: Tool Maker, Proto-language
Fossil Evidence: Fossil Skulls, Dmanisi, Georgia

HOMO ERECTUS GEORGICUS

 
Homo erectus georgicus
Homo erectus georgicus
The fossils are about 1.8 million years old. The remains were first discovered in 1991 by David Lordkipanidze. Implements and animal bones were found alongside the ancient human remains. The brain volume is approximately 600 cubic centimetres - roughly half the size of modern humans. It is the smallest hominid brain yet found outside Africa, apart from that of Homo floresiensis. Subsequently, four fossil skeletons were found, showing a species primitive in its skull and upper body but with relatively advanced spines and lower limbs, providing greater mobility.
 
Homo georgicus was bipedal, and diminuitive in size - the average male height was roughly 4 feet. Tooth-wear patterns reveal an omnivorous diet. The archaeological sites show no evidence of the use of fire.
 
The Dmanisi fossils may also represent a significant social and cultural development: a 1.8 million year old toothless jaw bone of a hunter-gatherer may be evidence of altruism and compassion - survival at this time, in this climate and on this diet did not follow the strict rules of evolutionary adaptation. This individual was cared for by others in the social group.
 
Homo georgicus may represent a link between Homo habilis and Homo erectus. This species may have been the first hominid to settle in Europe due to its discovery on the eastern shore of the Black Sea.