Cookie Consent by Cookie Consent by TermsFeed
 
The Rock Art Network George Nash
The Rock Art Network George Nash
The Rock Art Network George Nash
George Nash
Profile
Archaeologist & specialist in Prehistoric and Contemporary art Convener of the Welsh Rock art Organisation. Geosciences Centre of Coimbra University - (u. ID73-FCT); ITM (Earth and Memory Institute), Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (IPT), Portugal.

George is an Associate Professor and currently lectures part-time at the Geosciences Centre, University of Coimbra (IPT), Portugal. He is a member of management and academic committee and lectures architectural and landscape theory, prehistory and art, excavation and European heritage planning legislation and policy. Prior to this, George lectured at Bristol University, between 1998 and 2016. Here, George ran the final two years of a part-time degree, with also input to the fulltime BA and MA in Landscape programmes. At IPT George is responsible for MA/PhD supervision for undertakes research.

Away from academia, George is Principal Archaeologist with SLR Consulting and is responsible for SLR’s built heritage capabilities. George has over 30 years’ experience within the commercial heritage sector. George also has an extensive publishing record with over 35 authored, edited and co-edited books and 140 academic papers in print: focusing on the European post-medieval built heritage, prehistoric mortuary architecture, and prehistoric art. He is associated with a number of British and European university institutions and is a full member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (MCIfA).

George has directed and project-managed many high-profile heritage projects including Westminster Hall, Palace of Westminster (London) and the Neolithic burial-ritual monuments of La Hougue Bie and Delancey Park in the Channel Islands and Arthur’s Stone (Herefordshire), Perthi Duon, Trefael and Trellyffaint in Wales. George has also undertaken many projects outside the UK including the Vâdastra Fragmentation and Experimentation Project in southern Romania (funded by the World Bank) and has recently been involved in projects in Chile, Israel, NE Brazil, central Portugal and Sardinia. In May 2018 George published through Routledge the book Archaeologies of Rock Art: South American Perspectives. In 2017-18, George undertook fieldwork in Namibia for NamPower in advance of the installation of a biomass encroacher.

Since 2014 until present George is co-director in one of Britain’s largest dendrochronology projects – The Tilley Timber Project - funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund (a study of the chronological development of 35 timber-framed buildings). This is one of a number of heritage projects where George has successfully obtained external grant assistance (prepared the bid and then project managed its delivery).

Over the past 20 years George has advised, written and presented programmes for television including 'Marking Time’, 'Monsters We Met', 'Talking Landscapes' and 'The Natural History of Britain'. In 2008 he researched and presented five programmes for the BBC entitled 'The Drawings on the Wall'. Since 2010 George has provided expertise commentary on an array of subjects for radio and television.

In his native Wales, George is about to undertake a nation-wide survey of all prehistoric rock art sites. George, along with colleague Aron Mazel organise the British Rock Art Group (BRAG) annual conferences each year. As part of our publishing commitments, George and Aron will be producing our second edited book on the rock art of the Britain and Ireland (due out in late 2020).

In 2019, George, along with co-director Dr Sara Garcês, launched an international interactive website - The 1902 Committee (Go to: https://www.1902committee.com/)  This new website provides up to date news and views from around the world. The name of new website derives from when scientists began to seriously take note that rock art from the northern Spanish Cave of Altamira and caves within the Dordogne of South-western France was truly ancient. The Cave of Altamira was the first cave to receive scientific and public prominence when painted images were discovered there in 1879. This outstanding polychrome rock art assemblage was researched and promoted by Marcelino Sanz de Sautuola and Juan Vilanova y Piera in 1880 at the Prehistorical Congress in Lisbon. However, the discovery was fiercely criticised by the archaeological establishment, led by French specialists Gabriel de Mortillet and Émile Cartailhac. Their vicious attacks on Sautuola and Piera claimed that the Altamira paintings were a forgery and had been produced by a local artist. Following the discovery of paintings elsewhere, the forgery claims were retracted and the Sautuola and Piera hypothesis largely accepted. Following the ridiculing of the archaeological establishment, Cartailhac published a full apology in his paper 'Mae culpa d'un sceptique' in the leading French academic journal L'Anthropologie.

The Rock Art Network
→ Discover more about the Rock Art Network
→ Members and affiliated institutions of the Rock Art Network

Latest Article
→ Graffiti Dates and Names as a Rock Art Conservation and Management Tool
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
29 October 2020

Recent Articles
→ Animals in Rock Art
by Aron Mazel
7 October 2020
→ Reflecting Back: 40 Years Since ‘A Survey of the Rock Art in the Natal Drakensberg’ Project (1978-1981)
by Aron Mazel
29 September 2020
→ Art on the Rocks in the Age of COVID-19
by Neville Agnew & Tom McClintock
15 September 2020
→ Explore Cederberg rock art from your home
by Janette Deacon
9 September 2020
→ The Continuum of Art: The relationship between Ice Age art and contemporary art and how an understanding of the former can help engage a modern audience
by Peter Robinson
16 August 2020
→ Illuminating the Realm of the Dead: The Rock Art within the Dolmen de Soto, Andalucía, Southern Spain
by George Nash
29 July 2020
→ Rock Art Adventurous Field Work during COVID-19 in the Southernmost of South America
by María Isabel Hernández Llosas
9 June 2020
→ The Final Passage - FAQ
by Jean-Michel Geneste
1 June 2020
→ Experts rush to map fire-hit rock art
by Andrew Bock
15 May 2020
→ Sacred Indigenous rock art sites under threat
by Amy van den Berg
12 May 2020
→ Virtual Meeting
by Ben Dickins
22 April 2020
→ The Bradshaw Foundation Launches the Rock Art Network Website
by Wendy All
23 March 2020
→ The aftermath of fire damage to important rock art at the Baloon Cave tourist destination, Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Taçon
24 November 2019
→ The removal and camouflage of graffiti: The art of creating chaos out of order and order out of chaos
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
11 November 2019
→ The Histories of Australian Rock Art Research symposium, 8-9 December 2019, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Tacon
5 November 2019
→ San rock art exhibition at the National Museum & Research Center of Altamira
by Aron Mazel
17 September 2019
→ The 2018 Art on the Rocks Colloquium
by Wendy All
2 December 2018
→ Preserving Our Ancient Art Galleries: Volunteerism, Collaboration, and the Rock Art Archive
by Wendy All
1 December 2017
→ Altamira and the New Technology for Public Access
by Pilar Fatás Monforte
30 April 2017
→ From the Chauvet Cave to the Caverne du Pont d’Arc: Methods and Strategies for a Replica to Preserve the Heritage of a Decorated Cave That Cannot Be Made Accessible to the Public
by Jean-Michel Geneste
29 April 2017
→ Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
28 April 2017
→ Step by Step: The Power of Participatory Planning with Local Communities for Rock Art Management and Tourism
by Nicholas Hall
27 April 2017
→ Fundraising for Rock Art by Promoting Its Values
by Terry Little
26 April 2017

Follow the Bradshaw Foundation on social media for news & updates
Follow the Bradshaw Foundation
on social media for news & updates
Follow the Bradshaw Foundation on social media for news & updates
Follow the Bradshaw Foundation
on social media for news & updates
If you have enjoyed visiting this website
please consider adding a link © Bradshaw Foundation
 
 
Rock Art Network
LATEST ARTICLE
Rock Art Network
RECENT ARTICLES
Rock Art Network
→ Animals in Rock Art
by Aron Mazel
7 October 2020
→ Reflecting Back: 40 Years Since ‘A Survey of the Rock Art in the Natal Drakensberg’ Project (1978-1981)
by Aron Mazel
29 September 2020
→ Art on the Rocks in the Age of COVID-19
by Neville Agnew & Tom McClintock
15 September 2020
→ Explore Cederberg rock art from your home
by Janette Deacon
9 September 2020
→ The Continuum of Art: The relationship between Ice Age art and contemporary art and how an understanding of the former can help engage a modern audience
by Peter Robinson
16 August 2020
→ Illuminating the Realm of the Dead: The Rock Art within the Dolmen de Soto, Andalucía, Southern Spain
by George Nash
29 July 2020
→ Rock Art Adventurous Field Work during COVID-19 in the Southernmost of South America
by María Isabel Hernández Llosas
9 June 2020
→ The Final Passage - FAQ
by Jean-Michel Geneste
1 June 2020
→ Experts rush to map fire-hit rock art
by Andrew Bock
15 May 2020
→ Sacred Indigenous rock art sites under threat
by Amy van den Berg
12 May 2020
→ Virtual Meeting
by Ben Dickins
22 April 2020
→ The Bradshaw Foundation Launches the Rock Art Network Website
by Wendy All
23 March 2020
→ The aftermath of fire damage to important rock art at the Baloon Cave tourist destination, Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Taçon
24 November 2019
→ The removal and camouflage of graffiti: The art of creating chaos out of order and order out of chaos
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
11 November 2019
→ The Histories of Australian Rock Art Research symposium, 8-9 December 2019, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Tacon
5 November 2019
→ San rock art exhibition at the National Museum & Research Center of Altamira
by Aron Mazel
17 September 2019
→ The 2018 Art on the Rocks Colloquium
by Wendy All
2 December 2018
→ Preserving Our Ancient Art Galleries: Volunteerism, Collaboration, and the Rock Art Archive
by Wendy All
1 December 2017
→ Altamira and the New Technology for Public Access
by Pilar Fatás Monforte
30 April 2017
→ From the Chauvet Cave to the Caverne du Pont d’Arc: Methods and Strategies for a Replica to Preserve the Heritage of a Decorated Cave That Cannot Be Made Accessible to the Public
by Jean-Michel Geneste
29 April 2017
→ Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
28 April 2017
→ Step by Step: The Power of Participatory Planning with Local Communities for Rock Art Management and Tourism
by Nicholas Hall
27 April 2017
→ Fundraising for Rock Art by Promoting Its Values
by Terry Little
26 April 2017
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
Support our work & become a
Friend of the Foundation
 
 
Bradshaw Foundation Facebook
 
Bradshaw Foundation YouTube
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
Rock Art Network
LATEST ARTICLE
Rock Art Network
RECENT ARTICLES
Rock Art Network
→ Animals in Rock Art
by Aron Mazel
7 October 2020
→ Reflecting Back: 40 Years Since ‘A Survey of the Rock Art in the Natal Drakensberg’ Project (1978-1981)
by Aron Mazel
29 September 2020
→ Art on the Rocks in the Age of COVID-19
by Neville Agnew & Tom McClintock
15 September 2020
→ Explore Cederberg rock art from your home
by Janette Deacon
9 September 2020
→ The Continuum of Art: The relationship between Ice Age art and contemporary art and how an understanding of the former can help engage a modern audience
by Peter Robinson
16 August 2020
→ Illuminating the Realm of the Dead: The Rock Art within the Dolmen de Soto, Andalucía, Southern Spain
by George Nash
29 July 2020
→ Rock Art Adventurous Field Work during COVID-19 in the Southernmost of South America
by María Isabel Hernández Llosas
9 June 2020
→ The Final Passage - FAQ
by Jean-Michel Geneste
1 June 2020
→ Experts rush to map fire-hit rock art
by Andrew Bock
15 May 2020
→ Sacred Indigenous rock art sites under threat
by Amy van den Berg
12 May 2020
→ Virtual Meeting
by Ben Dickins
22 April 2020
→ The Bradshaw Foundation Launches the Rock Art Network Website
by Wendy All
23 March 2020
→ The aftermath of fire damage to important rock art at the Baloon Cave tourist destination, Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Taçon
24 November 2019
→ The removal and camouflage of graffiti: The art of creating chaos out of order and order out of chaos
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
11 November 2019
→ The Histories of Australian Rock Art Research symposium, 8-9 December 2019, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Tacon
5 November 2019
→ San rock art exhibition at the National Museum & Research Center of Altamira
by Aron Mazel
17 September 2019
→ The 2018 Art on the Rocks Colloquium
by Wendy All
2 December 2018
→ Preserving Our Ancient Art Galleries: Volunteerism, Collaboration, and the Rock Art Archive
by Wendy All
1 December 2017
→ Altamira and the New Technology for Public Access
by Pilar Fatás Monforte
30 April 2017
→ From the Chauvet Cave to the Caverne du Pont d’Arc: Methods and Strategies for a Replica to Preserve the Heritage of a Decorated Cave That Cannot Be Made Accessible to the Public
by Jean-Michel Geneste
29 April 2017
→ Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
28 April 2017
→ Step by Step: The Power of Participatory Planning with Local Communities for Rock Art Management and Tourism
by Nicholas Hall
27 April 2017
→ Fundraising for Rock Art by Promoting Its Values
by Terry Little
26 April 2017
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
Support our work & become a
Friend of the Foundation
 
 
Bradshaw Foundation Facebook
 
Bradshaw Foundation YouTube
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
Bradshaw Foundation iShop Shop Store
Bradshaw Foundation iShop Shop Store
Bradshaw Foundation iShop Shop Store