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Rock Art Network The Final Passage Chauvet Cave France
Rock Art Network The Final Passage Chauvet Cave France
Rock Art Network The Final Passage Chauvet Cave France
Rock Art Network
The Final Passage, a 28 minute cinematic journey through the 36,000 year old Chauvet Painted Cave, makes its online debut with free online viewing.
Online Film Premiere - May 7th 2020

by Martin Marquet
Film Producer, Member of the Rock Art Network

The Final Passage - Press Release

The Final Passage Rock Art Network Chauvet Cave France Martin Marquet
Martin Marquet
Film Producer
Over 36,000 years ago, humans were sparse and lonely in the world. Their tiny communities were lost in an ocean of animal populations. It was an unimaginable isolation that can compare to what we are experiencing right now, confined as we are in our too-narrow living spaces. Then, from the depths of this solitude, imagining their future, experimenting with color, form and sign, they invented art on the rocky walls of the world. “The Final Passage” is the opportunity of a virtual trip transporting us to that world. May this journey through time and through the origin of art re-enchant a world in danger.

The Final Passage Chauvet Cave
The Final Passage launched in 2015 at the Locarno Film Festival, The Getty Center, The British Museum and the Palais de Tokyo, but until today the film has never been released online and is finally made available to the world in the form of a gift from the filmmakers and international community of archaeologists leading a global movement dedicated to the conservation and promotion of Rock Art.

In the context of this pandemic and of national lockdowns, when Rock Art sites and their replicas are closed to the public, film producer Martin Marquet took the initiative to invite film director Pascal Magontier, Jean-Michel Geneste and the Rock Art Network to join him in making “The Final Passage” a gift to the world, with free and unlimited online viewings.

In the form of an introspective journey through the world of Rock Art, in the heart of the first art that ever existed, this exclusive online release of the “The Final Passage” is a timely event, symbolic of the depth of roots common to all humanity, inherited from immemorial time, 36,000 years ago in glacial Europe.

In the surroundings of the Chauvet Cave, humans had to face hardships and survive in a world they could not control, but in which animals were powerful and overabundant, just as the virus is reminding us today.

→ For more information and to watch The Final Passage, please visit: www.taraexpo.com

What to do when the human species is in danger?
“Questioning the essence of man is leading to an almost biological claim of belonging to the human species.” Robert Antelme - L’espèce humaine, Paris, 1947 

Humans live on distant horizons, once said a philosopher, observant of the past, on which we learn history, and constantly thrown into the future. Faced today with an unprecedented situation, the archaeologist that I am investigates the past to continue to understand what could consolidate and redirect the future on a better-shared basis.

What just happened to us? A living being on the planet, a new virus, an invisible, microscopic living being, has just reminded us of the fragility of the human species. How can we react to a planetary phenomenon that plunges us into the unknown when we thought we had mastered the world and nature?

The Final Passage Rock Art Network Chauvet Cave France Martin Marquet
Jean-Michel Geneste
Honorary curator for Cultural Heritage for the French Ministry of Culture
© Patricia Marquet Geneste

On the one hand, this health crisis is revealing what was already broken. The resulting pandemic reminds us that "nature" does not think. It is lavish, wild and cruel. It is the humans who think, and it is up to them not to manage nature, but to respect and seek an equilibrium with the myriad of other beings with whom we share existence. Over two months, the corona virus has spread to three billion human beings under the facilitating effects of an exacerbated globalization, the unlimited development of communication and economic routes, the drastic decrease in biodiversity and the misinformation fed to the population.

On the other hand, with distinctive contrast, the crisis reveals a deep desire for solidarity.  A lasting epidemic endangering the entire world is a suitable time for reappraisal. After the fear that has fallen upon us there will come a time to question ourselves with the desire for a new world. What will we learn from this world crisis?

We immediately draw new lessons from this. We must relearn that human life is the most precious of our value system. We must learn again that the strength of the mind is the only value that counts in times of crisis of any nature. Let’s be realistic - there will be other crises. They are already looming at our doorstep: climatic and geopolitical crises, and the migration crisis caused by each.

In the wake of the pandemic, taking into account our respective physiological frailties, we are coerced into reconnecting with our most profound human values. Thus, spiritual forces allow us to respond in the decisive hours. Ultimately, an unalterable sense of otherness and support, as well as the ability to assume collective responsibility at different levels between individuals and between nations, is reappearing. A new community is emerging. Universal values are being rediscovered. These values will enable us to fight more effectively against our blindness to a frenzied globalization; among them are the depth of territorial rootedness, cultural diversity and the inter-cultural exchanges that should flow from them all.

We will probably find new values, a new meaning of the world. A positive change in the concept of time and space is taking place right before our eyes. However, the function of time and space is fundamental for the living. Our current state of "real-time" communication on a global scale, a central characteristic of globalization, is now being replaced by a less impersonal time - specific to each of us - reflective of our lives on a more personal, even communal level; we have been blessed with an unexpected gift as a result of our constrained confinement. It is a time for the emergence of a new spiritual quality, which is a more interior time. This inner time, which is specific to our species, invites sharing and otherness among all. Imagination and poetry find their place in the luxury of this "regained time".

"The seat of the soul is where the inner world and the outer world meet," writes Novalis. In this crisis of the outer world questioning so many parameters, including some of the most profound ones affecting our human condition and the awareness we have of ourselves, shall we regain a soul?

Jean-Michel Geneste
March 2020

→ For more information and to watch The Final Passage, please visit: www.taraexpo.com

The Rock Art Network
→ Discover more about the Rock Art Network
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Latest Article
→ The Final Passage
by Martin Marquet
4 May 2020

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Rock Art Network
LATEST ARTICLE
Rock Art Network
→ The Final Passage
by Martin Marquet
4 May 2020
RECENT ARTICLES
Rock Art Network
→ Rock Art Adventurous Field Work during COVID-19 in the Southernmost of South America
by María Isabel Hernández Llosas
9 June 2020
→ The Final Passage - FAQ
by Jean-Michel Geneste
1 June 2020
→ Experts rush to map fire-hit rock art
by Andrew Bock
15 May 2020
→ Sacred Indigenous rock art sites under threat
by Amy van den Berg
12 May 2020
→ Virtual Meeting
by Ben Dickins
22 April 2020
→ The Bradshaw Foundation Launches the Rock Art Network Website
by Wendy All
23 March 2020
→ The aftermath of fire damage to important rock art at the Baloon Cave tourist destination, Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Taçon
24 November 2019
→ The removal and camouflage of graffiti: The art of creating chaos out of order and order out of chaos
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
11 November 2019
→ The Histories of Australian Rock Art Research symposium, 8-9 December 2019, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Tacon
5 November 2019
→ San rock art exhibition at the National Museum & Research Center of Altamira
by Aron Mazel
17 September 2019
→ The 2018 Art on the Rocks Colloquium
by Wendy All
2 December 2018
→ Preserving Our Ancient Art Galleries: Volunteerism, Collaboration, and the Rock Art Archive
by Wendy All
1 December 2017
→ Altamira and the New Technology for Public Access
by Pilar Fatás Monforte
30 April 2017
→ From the Chauvet Cave to the Caverne du Pont d’Arc: Methods and Strategies for a Replica to Preserve the Heritage of a Decorated Cave That Cannot Be Made Accessible to the Public
by Jean-Michel Geneste
29 April 2017
→ Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
28 April 2017
→ Step by Step: The Power of Participatory Planning with Local Communities for Rock Art Management and Tourism
by Nicholas Hall
27 April 2017
→ Fundraising for Rock Art by Promoting Its Values
by Terry Little
26 April 2017
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The Rock Art Network
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LATEST ARTICLE
Rock Art Network
→ The Final Passage
by Martin Marquet
4 May 2020
RECENT ARTICLES
Rock Art Network
→ Rock Art Adventurous Field Work during COVID-19 in the Southernmost of South America
by María Isabel Hernández Llosas
9 June 2020
→ The Final Passage - FAQ
by Jean-Michel Geneste
1 June 2020
→ Experts rush to map fire-hit rock art
by Andrew Bock
15 May 2020
→ Sacred Indigenous rock art sites under threat
by Amy van den Berg
12 May 2020
→ Virtual Meeting
by Ben Dickins
22 April 2020
→ The Bradshaw Foundation Launches the Rock Art Network Website
by Wendy All
23 March 2020
→ The aftermath of fire damage to important rock art at the Baloon Cave tourist destination, Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Taçon
24 November 2019
→ The removal and camouflage of graffiti: The art of creating chaos out of order and order out of chaos
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
11 November 2019
→ The Histories of Australian Rock Art Research symposium, 8-9 December 2019, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Tacon
5 November 2019
→ San rock art exhibition at the National Museum & Research Center of Altamira
by Aron Mazel
17 September 2019
→ The 2018 Art on the Rocks Colloquium
by Wendy All
2 December 2018
→ Preserving Our Ancient Art Galleries: Volunteerism, Collaboration, and the Rock Art Archive
by Wendy All
1 December 2017
→ Altamira and the New Technology for Public Access
by Pilar Fatás Monforte
30 April 2017
→ From the Chauvet Cave to the Caverne du Pont d’Arc: Methods and Strategies for a Replica to Preserve the Heritage of a Decorated Cave That Cannot Be Made Accessible to the Public
by Jean-Michel Geneste
29 April 2017
→ Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
28 April 2017
→ Step by Step: The Power of Participatory Planning with Local Communities for Rock Art Management and Tourism
by Nicholas Hall
27 April 2017
→ Fundraising for Rock Art by Promoting Its Values
by Terry Little
26 April 2017
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