Cookie Consent by Cookie Consent by TermsFeed
 
Rock Art Network Aron Mazel
Rock Art Network Aron Mazel
Rock Art Network Aron Mazel
Aron Mazel
And then they were gone: Destruction of the Good Hope 1 rock paintings
Rock Art Network

Aron Mazel
Newcastle University and University of the Witwatersrand

Rock Art Good Hope 1 uKhahlamba-Drakensberg Mountains South Africa Natal Drakensberg Natal Museum KwaZulu-Natal Museum Eland Paintings hunter-gatherers rock shelters
Figure 1
© Aron Mazel
On 19 August 1980, I visited Good Hope 1 (Figure 1), in the southern uKhahlamba-Drakensberg mountains (South Africa) for the first time. It was about the 250th rock art site I had recorded in the project ‘A survey of the Rock Art in the Natal Drakensberg’. The project’s overarching aim was to record accurate and thorough evidence of the paintings and related archaeological material in the mountain range to underpin management planning (Mazel 1981, 2018). Although I was based at the Natal Museum (now KwaZulu-Natal Museum), the project was funded by the Directorate of Forestry, which managed most of the mountains at the time. Even though I had already recorded many rock art sites, I was not prepared for what I encountered at Good Hope 1. I anticipated seeing the paintings which Patricia Vinnicombe (1976) had published only four years previously in People of the Eland. I was aware, from the book, that some of paintings had been deteriorating over the years but imagine my dismay when I discovered that some of the paintings that Vinnicombe had published no longer existed. Until then, I had not experienced a situation where it was so evident that paintings had been completely obliterated.

Having familiarised myself with Vinnicombe’s published redrawings of the Good Hope 1 paintings before my visit, I knew that some of the paintings would be in bad shape. This is clearly reflected in the scene focused on here, which Vinnicombe highlighted as a problem in People of the Eland by including a photograph of it published by Anderson in 1907 (Figure 2) and her 1958 tracing (Figure 2) where she commented that ‘a considerable amount of deterioration to have taken place, although the group was still quite recognisable’ (Vinnicombe 1976, 121). Ten years later, in 1968, she retraced the same scene noting ‘the paintings were so fragmentary as to be barely discerned’ (Figure 2; Vinnicombe 1976, 121). When I visited Good Hope 1, this scene was no longer there. Another example of the complete loss of paintings at the site, is that Vinnicombe (1976, 86) had noted the presence of three fish paintings, none of which I could record in 1980 because again they were not there. Vinnicombe (1976, 221) explains that the paintings ‘suffered much deterioration, partly due to the soft sandstone on which they are executed, and partly due to the repeated wetting and fingering by the many visitors from the nearby Sani Pass Hotel.’ The hotel’s practice of directing people to the site, which is across from their golf course, without adequate guidelines, was still in practice when I visited. While in the site, I showed a disappointed group of people the paintings that remained because they were struggling to see them.

The next day, 20 August 1980, I recorded Good Hope 2. That night, I noted in my daily journal: ‘It is interesting that while Good Hope 1 is very badly vandalised Good Hope 2 which is only 300m away and on a path has no vandalism at all.’ At Good Hope 1, I recorded 60 paintings whereas at Good Hope 2, I recorded 219 paintings. I suspect that originally Good Hope 1 had more paintings than Good Hope 2. This inference is based not only on the destruction wreaked on the Good Hope 1 paintings by visitors, but also because it is a considerably larger site (90m x 9m; Cable et al. 1980) than Good Hope 2 (25m x 3m; my recording), although I appreciate that we cannot assume that there is relationship between the size of a site and the number of paintings people made in them. Also, worth noting is that the hunter-gatherer occupation of Good Hope 1 extended back to 8000 years ago and it appears that their occupation was most extensive around 2000 years ago (Cable et al. 1980), during which time there appears to have been an upsurge in hunter-gatherers making paintings in uKhahlamba-Drakensberg (Mazel 2009). There may have been another upsurge of painting in the 1800s, and there are paintings belonging to this period in both sites (Figure 3 & Figure 4). It would seem that visitors were so disappointed by the Good Hope 1 paintings, they didn’t think it worthwhile visiting Good Hope 2, and the paintings were spared vandalism! Just as well as it contains an interesting array of images, including an eland lying on its back (Figure 5) and two animal heads with no bodies (Figure 6).

Jeff Guy and Justine Wintjes (2009) have ‘restored’ the obliterated scene digitally using Anderson’s photograph and Vinnicombe’s redrawings (Figure 7). Without archival imagery this would not have been possible. We know that the erosional forces, which created the rock shelters and overhangs are ongoing, probably now exacerbated by climate change and, therefore, the paintings will eventually erode away. Nonetheless, many of the paintings in the mountain range have lasted for 2000 years and some possibly for over 3000 years (Mazel & Watchman 2004). It is, therefore, hoped they would last well into the future if not interfered with by people.

At Good Hope 1, we have witnessed the rapid loss of paintings at the hands of people who either did not know, or care, about how to behave when viewing paintings. It begs the question whether similar behaviours would be tolerated in an art gallery. The responsibility of educating the public about the fragility of rock art continues to be a challenge for those of us concerned with its curation and safeguarding. This seminal moment occurred early on in my career. Emphasising the vulnerability of rock art, particularly at the hands of people, made me realise early on the importance of public education as captured in this statement: ‘Thus it is not stricter laws that are desired but rather the understanding and support of the general public’ (Mazel 1982, 7).

Rock Art Good Hope 1 uKhahlamba-Drakensberg Mountains South Africa Natal Drakensberg Natal Museum KwaZulu-Natal Museum Eland Paintings hunter-gatherers rock shelters
Figure 2
© Guy and Wintjes
 
Rock Art Good Hope 1 uKhahlamba-Drakensberg Mountains South Africa Natal Drakensberg Natal Museum KwaZulu-Natal Museum Eland Paintings hunter-gatherers rock shelters
Figure 3
© Aron Mazel
 
Rock Art Good Hope 1 uKhahlamba-Drakensberg Mountains South Africa Natal Drakensberg Natal Museum KwaZulu-Natal Museum Eland Paintings hunter-gatherers rock shelters
Figure 4
© Aron Mazel
 
Rock Art Good Hope 1 uKhahlamba-Drakensberg Mountains South Africa Natal Drakensberg Natal Museum KwaZulu-Natal Museum Eland Paintings hunter-gatherers rock shelters
Figure 5
© Aron Mazel
 
Rock Art Good Hope 1 uKhahlamba-Drakensberg Mountains South Africa Natal Drakensberg Natal Museum KwaZulu-Natal Museum Eland Paintings hunter-gatherers rock shelters
Figure 6
© Aron Mazel
 
Rock Art Good Hope 1 uKhahlamba-Drakensberg Mountains South Africa Natal Drakensberg Natal Museum KwaZulu-Natal Museum Eland Paintings hunter-gatherers rock shelters
Figure 7
© Guy and Wintjes 2009
Bibliography

Anderson, W. 1907. Third and final report of the geological survey of Natal and Zululand. London: West, Newman & Co. (Note: A photograph used her was taken at Good Hope 1 and published in 1907 by Anderson was reproduced in Vinnicombe, 1976).

Cable, J H C, Scott, K & Carter, P L 1980 Excavations at Good Hope Shelter, Underberg District, Natal, Annals of the Natal Museum 24 (1), 1-34.’ between ‘Anderson’ and ‘Guy’.

Guy, J. and Wintjes, J. 2009. Restoring Good Hope: rock art in the age of digital reproduction Southern African Humanities 21: 63–84.

Mazel, A.D. 1982. Principles for conserving the archaeological resources of the Natal Drakensberg. South African Archaeological Bulletin 37: 7-15. Mazel, A.D. 2009. Unsettled times: shaded polychrome paintings and hunter-gatherer history in the southeastern mountains of southern Africa. Southern African Humanities 21: 85-115.

Mazel, A.D. 2018. Reflecting back: 40 years since the ‘A survey of the Rock Art in the Natal Drakensberg’ project (1978-1981). The Digging Stick. 35 (1): 1-5. (Republished on 29 September 2020: Reflecting Back: 40 Years Since ‘A Survey of the Rock Art in the Natal Drakensberg’ Project).

Mazel, A.D. & Watchman, A.L. 2003. The dating of rock paintings in the Natal Drakensberg and the Biggarsberg, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Southern African Humanities 15: 59-73.

Vinnicombe, P. 1976. People of the Eland. Pietermaritzburg: University of Natal Press.

The Rock Art Network
→ Discover more about the Rock Art Network
→ Members and affiliated institutions of the Rock Art Network

Latest Article
→ 'Powerful Images - Indian rock art from its earliest times to recent times'
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak & Pilar Fatás
29 November 2022

Recent Articles
→ Signalling and Performance: Ancient Rock Art in Britain and Ireland
by Aron Mazel, George Nash
21/09/2022
→ Histories of Australian Rock Art Research
by Paul S.C. Taçon, Sally K. May, Ursula K. Frederick, Jo McDonald
07/07/2022
→ Rock Art and Tribal Art: Madhya Pradesh
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
26/07/2022
→ Marra Wonga: Archaeological and contemporary First Nations interpretations of one of central Queensland’s largest rock art sites
by Paul Taçon
20/07/2022
→ David Coulson MBE
by David Coulson
16 June 2022
→  Extraordinary Back-to-Back Human and Animal Figures in the Art of Western Arnhem Land, Australia: One of the World's Largest Assemblages
by Paul Taçon
25 April 2022
→  An online course by SEAMEO Regional Centre for Archaeology and Fine Arts (SPAFA)
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
20 April 2022
→  Cupules and Vulvas in the Alwar area, Rajasthan
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
14 March 2022
→  Color Engenders Life - Hunter-Gatherer Rock Art in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands
by Carolyn Boyd & Pilar Fatás
02 March 2022
→  David Coulson receives RGS Cherry Kearton Award
by David Coulson
07 February 2022
→  Vandalised petroglyphs in Texas
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
06 February 2022
→  Hand Stencils in Chhattisgarh
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
05 February 2022
→  And then they were gone: Destruction of the Good Hope 1 rock paintings
by Aron Mazel
28 January 2022
→  Early masterpieces: San hunter-gatherer shaded paintings of the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg and surrounding areas
by Aron Mazel
8 September 2021
→  Aїr Mountains Safari - Sahara
by David Coulson
17 August 2021
→  The Neolithic rock art passage tombs of Anglesey as brand-new virtual tours
by Ffion Reynolds
21 June 2021
→  A Map from the Memory of the World
by Janette Deacon
8 June 2021
→  The dangers of 'Discovering' rock art
by Peter Robinson
1 June 2021
→  Dharkundi and Deurkuthar Rock Art Sites in Central India
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
1 June 2021
→ Dating the Earth and its Rock Art
by Neville Agnew
23 May 2021
→ Studying the Source of Dust Using a Simple and Effective Methodology:
by Tom McClintock
30 April 2021
→ ABC Radio National 'Nightlife' with Philip Clark - 'Exploring the wonders of cave art in Australia'
by Professor Paul S.C. Taçon & Dr Josephine McDonald
30 April 2021
→ A Painted Treasure - San hunter-gatherer visual engagement with Didima Gorge (South Africa)
by Aron Mazel
10 March 2021
→ L'Atlas de la grotte Chauvet-Pont d'Arc
by
Jean-jacques Delannoy &
Jean-Michel Geneste
1 February 2021
→ Oldest cave painting found in Indonesia
by Rock Art Network
14 January 2021
→ Graffiti Dates and Names as a Rock Art Conservation and Management Tool
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
29 October 2020
→ Animals in Rock Art
by Aron Mazel
7 October 2020
→ Reflecting Back: 40 Years Since ‘A Survey of the Rock Art in the Natal Drakensberg’ Project (1978-1981)
by Aron Mazel
29 September 2020
→ Art on the Rocks in the Age of COVID-19
by Neville Agnew & Tom McClintock
15 September 2020
→ Explore Cederberg rock art from your home
by Janette Deacon
9 September 2020
→ The Continuum of Art: The relationship between Ice Age art and contemporary art and how an understanding of the former can help engage a modern audience
by Peter Robinson
16 August 2020
→ Illuminating the Realm of the Dead: The Rock Art within the Dolmen de Soto, Andalucía, Southern Spain
by George Nash
29 July 2020
→ Rock Art Adventurous Field Work during COVID-19 in the Southernmost of South America
by María Isabel Hernández Llosas
9 June 2020
→ The Final Passage - FAQ
by Jean-Michel Geneste
1 June 2020
→ Experts rush to map fire-hit rock art
by Andrew Bock
15 May 2020
→ Sacred Indigenous rock art sites under threat
by Amy van den Berg
12 May 2020
→ Virtual Meeting
by Ben Dickins
22 April 2020
→ The Bradshaw Foundation Launches the Rock Art Network Website
by Wendy All
23 March 2020
→ The aftermath of fire damage to important rock art at the Baloon Cave tourist destination, Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Taçon
24 November 2019
→ The removal and camouflage of graffiti: The art of creating chaos out of order and order out of chaos
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
11 November 2019
→ The Histories of Australian Rock Art Research symposium, 8-9 December 2019, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Tacon
5 November 2019
→ San rock art exhibition at the National Museum & Research Center of Altamira
by Aron Mazel
17 September 2019
→ The 2018 Art on the Rocks Colloquium
by Wendy All
2 December 2018
→ Preserving Our Ancient Art Galleries: Volunteerism, Collaboration, and the Rock Art Archive
by Wendy All
1 December 2017
→ Altamira and the New Technology for Public Access
by Pilar Fatás Monforte
30 April 2017
→ From the Chauvet Cave to the Caverne du Pont d’Arc: Methods and Strategies for a Replica to Preserve the Heritage of a Decorated Cave That Cannot Be Made Accessible to the Public
by Jean-Michel Geneste
29 April 2017
→ Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
28 April 2017
→ Step by Step: The Power of Participatory Planning with Local Communities for Rock Art Management and Tourism
by Nicholas Hall
27 April 2017
→ Fundraising for Rock Art by Promoting Its Values
by Terry Little
26 April 2017

Follow the Bradshaw Foundation on social media for news & updates
Follow the Bradshaw Foundation
on social media for news & updates
Follow the Bradshaw Foundation on social media for news & updates
Follow the Bradshaw Foundation
on social media for news & updates
If you have enjoyed visiting this website
please consider adding a link © Bradshaw Foundation
 
 
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
LATEST ARTICLE
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
RECENT ARTICLES
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
→ Signalling and Performance: Ancient Rock Art in Britain and Ireland
by Aron Mazel, George Nash
21/09/2022
→ Histories of Australian Rock Art Research
by Paul S.C. Taçon, Sally K. May, Ursula K. Frederick, Jo McDonald
07/07/2022
→ Rock Art and Tribal Art: Madhya Pradesh
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
26/07/2022
→ Marra Wonga: Archaeological and contemporary First Nations interpretations of one of central Queensland’s largest rock art sites
by Paul Taçon
20/07/2022
→ David Coulson MBE
by David Coulson
16 June 2022
→  Extraordinary Back-to-Back Human and Animal Figures in the Art of Western Arnhem Land, Australia: One of the World's Largest Assemblages
by Paul Taçon
25 April 2022
→  An online course by SEAMEO Regional Centre for Archaeology and Fine Arts (SPAFA)
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
20 April 2022
→  Cupules and Vulvas in the Alwar area, Rajasthan
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
14 March 2022
→  Color Engenders Life - Hunter-Gatherer Rock Art in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands
by Carolyn Boyd & Pilar Fatás
02 March 2022
→  David Coulson receives RGS Cherry Kearton Award
by David Coulson
07 February 2022
→  Vandalised petroglyphs in Texas
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
06 February 2022
→  Hand Stencils in Chhattisgarh
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
05 February 2022
→  And then they were gone: Destruction of the Good Hope 1 rock paintings
by Aron Mazel
28 January 2022
→  Early masterpieces: San hunter-gatherer shaded paintings of the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg and surrounding areas
by Aron Mazel
8 September 2021
→  Aїr Mountains Safari - Sahara
by David Coulson
17 August 2021
→  The Neolithic rock art passage tombs of Anglesey as brand-new virtual tours
by Ffion Reynolds
21 June 2021
→  A Map from the Memory of the World
by Janette Deacon
8 June 2021
→  The dangers of 'Discovering' rock art
by Peter Robinson
1 June 2021
→  Dharkundi and Deurkuthar Rock Art Sites in Central India
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
1 June 2021
→ Dating the Earth and its Rock Art
by Neville Agnew
23 May 2021
→ Studying the Source of Dust Using a Simple and Effective Methodology:
by Tom McClintock
30 April 2021
→ ABC Radio National 'Nightlife' with Philip Clark - 'Exploring the wonders of cave art in Australia'
by Professor Paul S.C. Taçon & Dr Josephine McDonald
30 April 2021
→ A Painted Treasure - San hunter-gatherer visual engagement with Didima Gorge (South Africa)
by Aron Mazel
10 March 2021
→ L'Atlas de la grotte Chauvet-Pont d'Arc
by
Jean-jacques Delannoy &
Jean-Michel Geneste
1 February 2021
→ Oldest cave painting found in Indonesia
by Rock Art Network
14 January 2021
→ Graffiti Dates and Names as a Rock Art Conservation and Management Tool
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
29 October 2020
→ Animals in Rock Art
by Aron Mazel
7 October 2020
→ Reflecting Back: 40 Years Since ‘A Survey of the Rock Art in the Natal Drakensberg’ Project (1978-1981)
by Aron Mazel
29 September 2020
→ Art on the Rocks in the Age of COVID-19
by Neville Agnew & Tom McClintock
15 September 2020
→ Explore Cederberg rock art from your home
by Janette Deacon
9 September 2020
→ The Continuum of Art: The relationship between Ice Age art and contemporary art and how an understanding of the former can help engage a modern audience
by Peter Robinson
16 August 2020
→ Illuminating the Realm of the Dead: The Rock Art within the Dolmen de Soto, Andalucía, Southern Spain
by George Nash
29 July 2020
→ Rock Art Adventurous Field Work during COVID-19 in the Southernmost of South America
by María Isabel Hernández Llosas
9 June 2020
→ The Final Passage - FAQ
by Jean-Michel Geneste
1 June 2020
→ Experts rush to map fire-hit rock art
by Andrew Bock
15 May 2020
→ Sacred Indigenous rock art sites under threat
by Amy van den Berg
12 May 2020
→ Virtual Meeting
by Ben Dickins
22 April 2020
→ The Bradshaw Foundation Launches the Rock Art Network Website
by Wendy All
23 March 2020
→ The aftermath of fire damage to important rock art at the Baloon Cave tourist destination, Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Taçon
24 November 2019
→ The removal and camouflage of graffiti: The art of creating chaos out of order and order out of chaos
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
11 November 2019
→ The Histories of Australian Rock Art Research symposium, 8-9 December 2019, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Tacon
5 November 2019
→ San rock art exhibition at the National Museum & Research Center of Altamira
by Aron Mazel
17 September 2019
→ The 2018 Art on the Rocks Colloquium
by Wendy All
2 December 2018
→ Preserving Our Ancient Art Galleries: Volunteerism, Collaboration, and the Rock Art Archive
by Wendy All
1 December 2017
→ Altamira and the New Technology for Public Access
by Pilar Fatás Monforte
30 April 2017
→ From the Chauvet Cave to the Caverne du Pont d’Arc: Methods and Strategies for a Replica to Preserve the Heritage of a Decorated Cave That Cannot Be Made Accessible to the Public
by Jean-Michel Geneste
29 April 2017
→ Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
28 April 2017
→ Step by Step: The Power of Participatory Planning with Local Communities for Rock Art Management and Tourism
by Nicholas Hall
27 April 2017
→ Fundraising for Rock Art by Promoting Its Values
by Terry Little
26 April 2017
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
Support our work & become a
Friend of the Foundation
 
 
 
Bradshaw Foundation YouTube
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
LATEST ARTICLE
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
RECENT ARTICLES
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
→ Signalling and Performance: Ancient Rock Art in Britain and Ireland
by Aron Mazel, George Nash
21/09/2022
→ Histories of Australian Rock Art Research
by Paul S.C. Taçon, Sally K. May, Ursula K. Frederick, Jo McDonald
07/07/2022
→ Rock Art and Tribal Art: Madhya Pradesh
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
26/07/2022
→ Marra Wonga: Archaeological and contemporary First Nations interpretations of one of central Queensland’s largest rock art sites
by Paul Taçon
20/07/2022
→ David Coulson MBE
by David Coulson
16 June 2022
→  Extraordinary Back-to-Back Human and Animal Figures in the Art of Western Arnhem Land, Australia: One of the World's Largest Assemblages
by Paul Taçon
25 April 2022
→  An online course by SEAMEO Regional Centre for Archaeology and Fine Arts (SPAFA)
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
20 April 2022
→  Cupules and Vulvas in the Alwar area, Rajasthan
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
14 March 2022
→  Color Engenders Life - Hunter-Gatherer Rock Art in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands
by Carolyn Boyd & Pilar Fatás
02 March 2022
→  David Coulson receives RGS Cherry Kearton Award
by David Coulson
07 February 2022
→  Vandalised petroglyphs in Texas
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
06 February 2022
→  Hand Stencils in Chhattisgarh
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
05 February 2022
→  And then they were gone: Destruction of the Good Hope 1 rock paintings
by Aron Mazel
28 January 2022
→  Early masterpieces: San hunter-gatherer shaded paintings of the uKhahlamba-Drakensberg and surrounding areas
by Aron Mazel
8 September 2021
→  Aїr Mountains Safari - Sahara
by David Coulson
17 August 2021
→  The Neolithic rock art passage tombs of Anglesey as brand-new virtual tours
by Ffion Reynolds
21 June 2021
→  A Map from the Memory of the World
by Janette Deacon
8 June 2021
→  The dangers of 'Discovering' rock art
by Peter Robinson
1 June 2021
→  Dharkundi and Deurkuthar Rock Art Sites in Central India
by Meenakshi Dubey-Pathak
1 June 2021
→ Dating the Earth and its Rock Art
by Neville Agnew
23 May 2021
→ Studying the Source of Dust Using a Simple and Effective Methodology:
by Tom McClintock
30 April 2021
→ ABC Radio National 'Nightlife' with Philip Clark - 'Exploring the wonders of cave art in Australia'
by Professor Paul S.C. Taçon & Dr Josephine McDonald
30 April 2021
→ A Painted Treasure - San hunter-gatherer visual engagement with Didima Gorge (South Africa)
by Aron Mazel
10 March 2021
→ L'Atlas de la grotte Chauvet-Pont d'Arc
by
Jean-jacques Delannoy &
Jean-Michel Geneste
1 February 2021
→ Oldest cave painting found in Indonesia
by Rock Art Network
14 January 2021
→ Graffiti Dates and Names as a Rock Art Conservation and Management Tool
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
29 October 2020
→ Animals in Rock Art
by Aron Mazel
7 October 2020
→ Reflecting Back: 40 Years Since ‘A Survey of the Rock Art in the Natal Drakensberg’ Project (1978-1981)
by Aron Mazel
29 September 2020
→ Art on the Rocks in the Age of COVID-19
by Neville Agnew & Tom McClintock
15 September 2020
→ Explore Cederberg rock art from your home
by Janette Deacon
9 September 2020
→ The Continuum of Art: The relationship between Ice Age art and contemporary art and how an understanding of the former can help engage a modern audience
by Peter Robinson
16 August 2020
→ Illuminating the Realm of the Dead: The Rock Art within the Dolmen de Soto, Andalucía, Southern Spain
by George Nash
29 July 2020
→ Rock Art Adventurous Field Work during COVID-19 in the Southernmost of South America
by María Isabel Hernández Llosas
9 June 2020
→ The Final Passage - FAQ
by Jean-Michel Geneste
1 June 2020
→ Experts rush to map fire-hit rock art
by Andrew Bock
15 May 2020
→ Sacred Indigenous rock art sites under threat
by Amy van den Berg
12 May 2020
→ Virtual Meeting
by Ben Dickins
22 April 2020
→ The Bradshaw Foundation Launches the Rock Art Network Website
by Wendy All
23 March 2020
→ The aftermath of fire damage to important rock art at the Baloon Cave tourist destination, Carnarvon Gorge, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Taçon
24 November 2019
→ The removal and camouflage of graffiti: The art of creating chaos out of order and order out of chaos
by Johannes H. N. Loubser
11 November 2019
→ The Histories of Australian Rock Art Research symposium, 8-9 December 2019, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
by Paul Tacon
5 November 2019
→ San rock art exhibition at the National Museum & Research Center of Altamira
by Aron Mazel
17 September 2019
→ The 2018 Art on the Rocks Colloquium
by Wendy All
2 December 2018
→ Preserving Our Ancient Art Galleries: Volunteerism, Collaboration, and the Rock Art Archive
by Wendy All
1 December 2017
→ Altamira and the New Technology for Public Access
by Pilar Fatás Monforte
30 April 2017
→ From the Chauvet Cave to the Caverne du Pont d’Arc: Methods and Strategies for a Replica to Preserve the Heritage of a Decorated Cave That Cannot Be Made Accessible to the Public
by Jean-Michel Geneste
29 April 2017
→ Emerging Consciousness and New Media: The Management of Rock Art in Southeast Asia and New Opportunities for Communicating Its Significance
by Noel Hidalgo Tan
28 April 2017
→ Step by Step: The Power of Participatory Planning with Local Communities for Rock Art Management and Tourism
by Nicholas Hall
27 April 2017
→ Fundraising for Rock Art by Promoting Its Values
by Terry Little
26 April 2017
Bradshaw Foundation Donate Friends
Support our work & become a
Friend of the Foundation
 
 
 
Bradshaw Foundation YouTube
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
The Rock Art Network
Bradshaw Foundation iShop Shop Store
Bradshaw Foundation iShop Shop Store
Bradshaw Foundation iShop Shop Store